Mentors International recently partnered with MorpH2O, a local Utah company, to begin a pilot test of a project with the potential to change lives—and the first step is water conservation.

The project centers on a green water irrigation system including solar-powered sensors. These sensors will read the water levels in the soil in order to determine the exact amount of water each crop needs, at which point it will shut off the irrigation in that area. This will prevent plants from getting too much or too little water.

Knowing the exact amount of water needed, allows the pumps used to be small and transportable. The idea is to incorporate the pump into a bicycle so it will be mobile.

Because of the strict water regulation, the water farmers currently possess will be used more effectively. This gives farmers the opportunity to increase their crop yield as well as add additional crops such as pumpkins and eggplants, allowing farmers to earn a higher profit.

Mentors has begun the pilot testing for this program with farmers in Honduras, where drought conditions are currently high. However, after a successful pilot test, Mentors’ goal is to expand the project into more of HondurasGuatemala and other countries following.

Otoniel Manley, executive director of Mentors International Honduras and native to Honduras, said, “MorpH2O is providing poor farmers an opportunity we have never seen before in our country.”

Manley expressed great faith in the potential of this project. “I can see an increase in self-sufficiency as a country,” Manley said. “I can see hope for our future. I can see well-nourished children, an abundance in crop production and a substantial reduction of poverty.”

These sensors have been successfully installed and implemented in different projects around the US to reduce water usage.


Article written by Bailey Fruit

Help us Transform Generational Poverty
into Sustainable Self-Reliance

Through our proven programs of personal and business development, each $1 donated creates $5 of economic impact in developing countries where we serve.

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Mentors Monthly